What I Learned Losing a Million Dollars

An enjoy­able read with some good life lessons regard­less of whether you’ve made it to a mil­lion yet or not. This book helps us approach our suc­cess with humil­i­ty as a way to express grat­i­tude for the part of our suc­cess that didn’t have any­thing to do with what we’ve actu­al­ly done.

Like this quote:

Personalizing suc­cess­es sets peo­ple up for dis­as­trous fail­ure. They begin to treat the suc­cess as a per­son­al reflec­tion rather than the result of cap­i­tal­iz­ing on a good oppor­tu­ni­ty, being at the right place at the right time or even being just plain lucky.

The high from “being right” the mar­ket and mak­ing all that mon­ey is unbe­liev­able. It can­not be dupli­cat­ed with drugs. You are total­ly invin­ci­ble. You are imper­vi­ous to all pain. There’s noth­ing bad in the world.

It reminds me of anoth­er of my favorite books (The Four Agreements) that reminds us not to take any of life per­son­al­ly because it’s not per­son­al.

2017 Was a good year for dividend investors

It looks like 2018 will be even bet­ter. Which makes sense con­sid­er­ing the recent­ly passed tax leg­is­la­tion. Money com­ing back from over­seas is like­ly to be returned to share­hold­ers as much (or more than) it will be used to cre­ate jobs. Companies that increase their div­i­dends are a gift that keeps on giv­ing.

Apple for retirement portfolios

Apple has a ton of cash and CEO Tim Cook has explicitly said he wants to raise the dividend each year.

Regardless of what you think about Apple prod­ucts, Apple the com­pa­ny is worth a look at for your port­fo­lio. Especially your retire­ment port­fo­lio. Apple has a lot of mon­ey in the bank (and the cur­rent tax plan favors their return­ing it to the US) and has been rais­ing it’s div­i­dend year­ly for a few years. CEO Tim […]

Complete analysis of 2017 Dividend Aristocrats

There are 51 com­pa­nies which have increased their div­i­dends for 25 or more con­sec­u­tive years. As you know, I love these com­pa­nies because I find it valu­able to mea­sure the “pay­check” they deliv­er (through div­i­dends) and the “raise” they deliv­er through div­i­dend increas­es (help­ing to beat infla­tion AND help­ing invest­ing be fun). Ben Reynolds over at Sure […]

Will you have enough saved to retire?

401(k) plans were over-hyped when they were launched and gave employers a way to reduce spending on pension plans; a double-whammy that's going to affect your retirement

If the stats in this Wall Street Journal piece are any indi­ca­tion, you won’t. In 2013, near­ly half of US Households didn’t even have a retire­ment sav­ings account. For those that do, the amount saved isn’t near­ly enough to fund retire­ment. Especially as we live longer: And the sav­ings gap is wors­en­ing. Fifty-two per­cent of U.S. […]

Will you have enough to retire?

Curious about why stocks go down on good news (or up on bad)

Answer: Investing is not science, sometimes expectations are priced in so the news itself doesn't matter in the way you think.

I think it’s help­ful to invest in a com­pa­ny you know, pri­mar­i­ly because when you are inter­est­ed in your invest­ments you’ll learn more about them. I also believe that you’ll learn more about how the mar­ket works, because you’ll be more curi­ous. Have you ever seen a com­pa­ny release good news (or announce good earn­ings) and […]

What’s stopping you from investing?

Stockpile tweet­ed a quote from my Stockpile review the oth­er day that got me to ask myself a sim­ple ques­tion about invest­ing. I want you to ask your­self this same ques­tion, but first the tweet: “I think their low min­i­mums & the diver­si­ty of stocks are great, ppl real­ly don’t have an excuse not to invest […]

Can you afford to buy a home?

This has been on my mind a lot over the last few years. From a simple observational perspective in much of Manhattan, do the math. Without parental help, it's simply impossible to buy a family-sized apartment.

While mort­gages have become more acces­si­ble over time, the fun­da­men­tals haven’t changed. You put a por­tion of mon­ey down, the rest cov­ered by a loan of either 30 or 15 years. The bank col­lects tax­es and holds them in escrow, pay­ing them for you (to low­er their own risk). And, if you put down less […]

Dollar Cost Averaging: What is it good for?

Dollar cost averaging provides an advantage for lowering your investing costs over time, which are best used to reinforce a healthy wealth building habit rather than to determine when to invest a lump sum.

Even the phrase “dol­lar cost aver­ag­ing” should put most peo­ple to sleep. Yet, here it is. Dollar cost aver­ag­ing is an invest­ing “strat­e­gy” that basi­cal­ly says, if you invest the same amount reg­u­lar­ly over time, some­times you buy high and oth­er times low­er. Because you’re invest­ing the same amount of mon­ey each time, when prices are low­er […]